Monthly Archives: September 2015

Looking for a Rental Property?

Black and Cherry Real Estate manage over 600 properties. We have many available rentals and a very qualified leasing team. If you are looking for a Rental or even a home to purchase, Reach out to our office for information for an Agent to help…

Featured below is one of our Available Properties:

A Wonderful 2 Story 3 Bedroom with spacious loft and huge Master Suite, master bath with separate tub/shower and large walk-in closet. Home features Granite counters & Maple cabinetry, large family room and formal dining, tile/carpet flooring, media niche, soft water loop and two car garage, covered patio with easy care desert landscape.

 

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION:

 

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The Buyers Guide

Read the list below of a buyers guide and process to purchasing a home.

1. Start with your credit. Credit reports are kept by the three major credit agencies, Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. They show whether you are habitually late with payments and whether you have run into serious credit problems in the past.
A credit score is a number calculated from a formula created by Fair Isaac based on the information in your credit report. You have three different credit scores, one for each of your credit reports.

A low credit score may hurt your chances for getting the best interest rate, or getting financing at all. So get a copy of your reports and know your credit scores. Try Fair Isaac’s MyFICO.com.
Errors are common. If you find any, contact the agencies directly to correct them, which can take two or three months to resolve. If the report is accurate but shows past problems, be prepared to explain them to a loan officer.
2. Set your budget. Next, you need to determine how much house you can afford. You can start with an online calculator. For a more accurate figure, ask to be pre-approved by a lender, who will look at your income, debt and credit to determine the kind of loan that’s in your league.
The rule of thumb is to aim for a home that costs about two-and-a-half times your gross annual salary. If you have significant credit card debt or other financial obligations like alimony or even an expensive hobby, then you may need to set your sights lower.
Another rule of thumb: All your monthly home payments should not exceed 36% of your gross monthly income.
The size of your down payment will also determine how much you can afford.
3. Line up cash. You’ll need to come up with cash for your down payment and closing costs. Lenders like to see 20% of the home’s price as a down payment. If you can put down more than that, the lender may be willing to approve a larger loan. If you have less, you’ll need to find loans that can accommodate you.
Various private and public agencies — including Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the Federal Housing Administration, and the Department of Veterans Affairs — provide low down payment mortgages through banks and mortgage companies. If you qualify, it’s possible to pay as little as 3% up front.
A warning: With a down payment under 20%, you will probably wind up having to pay for private mortgage insurance, a safety net protecting the bank in case you fail to make payments. PMI adds about 0.5% of the total loan amount to your mortgage payments for the year.
Once you’ve considered the down payment, make sure you’ve got enough to cover fees and closing costs. These may include the appraisal fee, loan fees, attorney’s fees, inspection fees, and the cost of a title search. They can easily add up to more than $10,000 — and often run to 5% of the mortgage amount.
If your available cash doesn’t cover your needs, you have several options. First-time homebuyers can withdraw up to $10,000 without penalty from an Individual Retirement Account, if you have one, though you must pay taxes on the amount. You can also receive a cash gift of up to $14,000 a year from each of your parents without triggering a gift tax.
Check on whether your employer can help; some big companies will chip in on the down payment or help you get a low-interest loan from selected lenders. You can also tap a 401(k) or similar retirement plan for a loan from yourself.
4. Find an agent: Most sellers list their homes through an agent — but those agents work for the seller, not you. They’re paid based on a percentage, usually 5 to 7% of the purchase price, so their interest will be in getting you to pay more.
You need “exclusive buyer agent.” Sometimes buyer agents are paid directly by you, on an hourly or contracted fee. Other times they split the commission that the seller’s agent gets upon sale. A buyer’s representative has the same access to homes for sale that a seller’s agent does, but his or her allegiance is supposed to be only to you.
5. Search for a home. Your first step here is to figure out what city or neighborhood you want to live in. Look for signs of economic vitality: a mixture of young families and older couples, low unemployment and good incomes.
Pay special attention to districts with good schools, even if you don’t have school-age children. When it comes time to sell, you’ll find that a strong school system is a major advantage in helping your home retain or gain value.
Try also to get an idea about the real estate market in the area. For example, if homes are selling close to or even above the asking price, that shows the area is desirable. If you have the flexibility, consider doing your house hunt in the off-season — meaning, generally, the colder months of the year. You’ll have less competition and sellers may be more willing to negotiate.
Be wary of choosing search criteria that are too restrictive. For example, select a price range 10% above and 10% below your true range. Add a 10-mile cushion to the location you specify.
6. Make an offer. Once you find the house you want, move quickly to make your bid. If you’re working with a buyer’s broker, then get advice from him or her on an initial offer. If you’re working with a seller’s agent, devise the strategy yourself.
Try to line up data on at least three houses that have sold recently in the neighborhood. If you really want the house, don’t lowball. The seller may give up in disgust. Remember, that your leverage depends on the pace of the market. In a slow market, you’ve got muscle; in a hot market, you may have none at all.
There’s no foolproof system for negotiating a fair price. Occasionally it’s best to deal directly with the seller yourself. More often it’s better to work exclusively through intermediaries.
Be creative about finding ways to satisfy the seller’s needs. For instance, ask if the seller would throw in kitchen and laundry appliances if you meet his price — or take them away in exchange for a lower price.
Once you reach a mutually acceptable price, the seller’s agent will draw up an offer to purchase that includes an estimated closing date (usually 45 to 60 days from acceptance of the offer).
7. Enter contract. Have your lawyer or buyers agent review this document to make sure the deal is contingent upon:
1. your obtaining a mortgage
2. a home inspection that shows no significant defects
3. a guarantee that you may conduct a walk-through inspection 24 hours before closing.
You also need to make a good-faith deposit — usually 1% to 10% of the purchase price — that should be deposited into an escrow account. The seller will receive this money after the deal has closed. If the deal falls through, you will get the money back only if you or the home failed any of the contingency clauses.
8. Secure a loan. Now call your mortgage broker or lender and move quickly to agree on terms, if you have not already done so. This is when you decide whether to go with the fixed rate or adjustable rate mortgage and whether to pay points. Expect to pay $50 to $75 for a credit check at this point, and another $150, on average to $300 for an appraisal of the home. Most other fees will be due at the closing.
If you don’t already have one, look into taking out a homeowner’s insurance policy, too. Most lenders require that you have homeowner’s insurance in place before they’ll approve your loan.
9. Get an inspection: In addition to the appraisal that the mortgage lender will make of your home, you should hire your own home inspector. An inspection costs about $300, on average, and up to $1,000 for a big job and takes two hours or more.
Ask to be present during the inspection, because you will learn a lot about your house, including its overall condition, construction materials, wiring, and heating. If the inspector turns up major problems, like a roof that needs to be replaced, then ask your lawyer or agent to discuss it with the seller. You will either want the seller to fix the problem before you move in, or deduct the cost of the repair from the final price. If the seller won’t agree to either remedy you may decide to walk away from the deal, which you can do without penalty if you have that contingency written into the contract.
10. Close the deal. About two days before the actual closing, you will receive a final HUD Settlement Statement from your lender that lists all the charges you can expect to pay at closing.
Review it carefully. It will include things like the cost of title insurance that protects you and the lender from any claims someone may make regarding ownership of your property. The cost of title insurance varies greatly from state to state but usually comes in at less than 1% of the home’s price.
The lender might also require you to establish an escrow account, which it can tap if you fall behind on your mortgage or property tax payments. Lenders can require deposits of up to two months’ worth of payments.
The actual closing is often somewhat anticlimactic. It’s a ritual affair, with customs that differ by region. Your lawyer or real estate agent can brief you on the particulars.

 

 

http://money.cnn.com/pf/money-essentials-home-buying/index.html?iid=EL

Cold Weather is Approaching!

Ever wonder where there are Mountain Escapes in other cities… Well this article features some winter getaway spots around the US.  Read below…

 

Have you considered buying the property you are currently renting?

If so, Read the article featured below that gives you tips on the transition of renting to owning. You might find this very helpful in making a decision also!

 

 

Want to know some secrets on selling your home?

Some of these secrets on selling your home are common, but it never hurts to remind yourself what buyers are actually looking at. Read this article that lists some of these tips…

 

Selling Secret #10: Pricing it right
Find out what your home is worth, then shave 15 to 20 percent off the price. You’ll be stampeded by buyers with multiple bids — even in the worst markets — and they’ll bid up the price over what it’s worth. It takes real courage and most sellers just don’t want to risk it, but it’s the single best strategy to sell a home in today’s market.

Selling Secret #9: Half-empty closets
Storage is something every buyer is looking for and can never have enough of. Take half the stuff out of your closets then neatly organize what’s left in there. Buyers will snoop, so be sure to keep all your closets and cabinets clean and tidy.

Selling Secret #8: Light it up
Maximize the light in your home. After location, good light is the one thing that every buyer cites that they want in a home. Take down the drapes, clean the windows, change the lampshades, increase the wattage of your light bulbs and cut the bushes outside to let in sunshine. Do what you have to do make your house bright and cheery – it will make it more sellable.

Selling Secret #7: Play the agent field
A secret sale killer is hiring the wrong broker. Make sure you have a broker who is totally informed. They must constantly monitor the multiple listing service (MLS), know what properties are going on the market and know the comps in your neighborhood. Find a broker who embraces technology – a tech-savvy one has many tools to get your house sold.

Selling Secret #6: Conceal the critters
You might think a cuddly dog would warm the hearts of potential buyers, but you’d be wrong. Not everybody is a dog- or cat-lover. Buyers don’t want to walk in your home and see a bowl full of dog food, smell the kitty litter box or have tufts of pet hair stuck to their clothes. It will give buyers the impression that your house is not clean. If you’re planning an open house, send the critters to a pet hotel for the day.

Selling Secret #5: Don’t over-upgrade
Quick fixes before selling always pay off. Mammoth makeovers, not so much. You probably won’t get your money back if you do a huge improvement project before you put your house on the market. Instead, do updates that will pay off and get you top dollar. Get a new fresh coat of paint on the walls. Clean the curtains or go buy some inexpensive new ones. Replace door handles, cabinet hardware, make sure closet doors are on track, fix leaky faucets and clean the grout.

Selling Secret #4: Take the home out of your house
One of the most important things to do when selling your house is to de-personalize it. The more personal stuff in your house, the less potential buyers can imagine themselves living there. Get rid of a third of your stuff – put it in storage. This includes family photos, memorabilia collections and personal keepsakes. Consider hiring a home stager to maximize the full potential of your home. Staging simply means arranging your furniture to best showcase the floor plan and maximize the use of space.

15 Home Staging Secrets

SEE ALL PHOTOS

Get expert advice on how to highlight your home’s strengths.

Selling Secret #3: The kitchen comes first
You’re not actually selling your house, you’re selling your kitchen – that’s how important it is. The benefits of remodeling your kitchen are endless, and the best part of it is that you’ll probably get 85% of your money back. It may be a few thousand dollars to replace countertops where a buyer may knock $10,000 off the asking price if your kitchen looks dated. The fastest, most inexpensive kitchen updates include painting and new cabinet hardware. Use a neutral-color paint so you can present buyers with a blank canvas where they can start envisioning their own style. If you have a little money to spend, buy one fancy stainless steel appliance. Why one? Because when people see one high-end appliance they think all the rest are expensive too and it updates the kitchen.

Painting Kitchen Cabinets

Update the look of your kitchen with these pro tips.

Selling Secret #2: Always be ready to show
Your house needs to be “show-ready” at all times – you never know when your buyer is going to walk through the door. You have to be available whenever they want to come see the place and it has to be in tip-top shape. Don’t leave dishes in the sink, keep the dishwasher cleaned out, the bathrooms sparkling and make sure there are no dust bunnies in the corners. It’s a little inconvenient, but it will get your house sold.

Selling Secret #1: The first impression is the only impression
No matter how good the interior of your home looks, buyers have already judged your home before they walk through the door. You never have a second chance to make a first impression. It’s important to make people feel warm, welcome and safe as they approach the house. Spruce up your home’s exterior with inexpensive shrubs and brightly colored flowers. You can typically get a 100-percent return on the money you put into your home’s curb appeal. Entryways are also important. You use it as a utility space for your coat and keys. But, when you’re selling, make it welcoming by putting in a small bench, a vase of fresh-cut flowers or even some cookies.

 

http://www.hgtv.com/design/decorating/design-101/10-best-kept-secrets-for-selling-your-home

Stop hoarding.. And learn what should go in storage!

Do you like to hold on to things? Or maybe your closets and garage are getting a little to full! Learn how to get organized and understand what should go into storage with these steps:

 

 

HOME AND LIVING / SEPTEMBER 4, 2015

Do you hate moving?

This interesting article explains how hiring a moving company isn’t as expensive as you think. And is probably the solution to all your stress over moving again. Read below a couple reasons why…

Many people laugh at the idea of hiring a moving company because they have the misconception that hiring one is expensive. In reality, hiring a moving company is not nearly as expensive as it seems. In fact, if you compare moving companies on Unpakt, you will find that most companies have very reasonable rates considering the time, effort, and skill they put into making your move smooth and trouble-free, especially if you consider the alternative of a DIY move

Here are 5 reasons why hiring a moving company isn’t as expensive as it seems:

  1. Time:

Think of the time it will take you to pack your belongings, load them into your car or rental truck, drive all the way to your new address, unload the cargo, and move them into their designated place. Keep in mind that you will need someone (or several people) to help you during the entire process of the move from pickup to drop off.  Moving companies handle jobs like this daily and know a few things about how to properly move your belongings efficiently.

Skills

  1. Skills:

Organizing a move requires a number of different skills that you may not have. Do you know how to properly move a couch or heavy appliance without causing damage to yourself, the item or your apartment? Movers are trained and have the proper equipment to maneuver heavy pieces of furniture and appliances. They are also skilled at assembling and disassembling furniture, dismounting electronics and packing fragile valuables. When you hire a moving company, you get a team of professionals to handle your move.

  1. Insurance:

What happens if you get into an accident and your belongings are damaged, lost, or stolen? Even worse, what if there is an accident and damage to the building is caused? No matter how careful you are, you cannot completely eliminate the chances of mishaps happening. When you hire a professional moving company, you’ll be covered in case there is any damage to your building. You can also purchase additional insurance to cover potential damages to your belongings in case something happens.

Effort

  1. Effort:

Moving requires you to put in so much effort that you may neglect other responsibilities, like switching over your gas, electric and internet accounts a few days before and taking a picture of your meters before you move. You don’t want to end up paying for the new tenants usage or get into your new home with no water or electricity. By hiring a moving company who is trained at handling the actual moving tasks like transportation logistics loading and unloading, you’re free to concentrate on the important tasks only you can handle.

Equipment and Supplies

  1. Equipment & Supplies:

When moving on your own, you may have to rent a truck, purchase equipment to lift heavy objects, and hire help to pack and load your belongings. Ultimately, their combined costs may be more than what a moving company would charge you for the entire package.

If you were to move yourself, it would probably take twice as long and could cost you more than what hiring a moving company would. Different moving companies have different rates and offer different services, so comparing moving companies, prices, and reviews could save you a lot of money. It is also important to verify that the moving company you plan to hire is licensed and insured so you’ll be covered in case something happens.

Unpakt is a price comparison website for moving companies. We help customers compare licensed moving companies, read real reviews, and book a guaranteed price within minutes. Unpakt makes moving safe and easy.

 

 

http://hotpads.com/blog/2015/07/5-reasons-why-hiring-a-moving-company-isnt-as-expensive-as-it-seems/#.VfNS_9JViko

First time renter?

Read the article featured below that describes the experience of being a first time renter. This article explains all the obstacles that you may come in contact with and some great ways to make sure you have everything in order. Make renting easier and read below!